fbpx

About the Food Bank

Trying New Foods with Taste It! & Eat Fresh

Trying new foods can be intimidating for adults and children alike. After all, wariness about unfamiliar foods is one way our brain balances our innate sense of curiosity as humans. Without that little voice that says Wait, are you really sure you want to eat that green thing? we’d run a much higher risk of ingesting harmful or toxic substances.

However, this same instinct can create a big roadblock when it comes to people, especially kids, branching out from their comfort zone and trying vegetables, grains and other nutritious foods that they’ve never had before. Repeat exposure helps new things seem less peculiar and increases the chances that someone might try something they once turned down. And if those new foods are paired with more recognizable ingredients, all the better. Beets, for example, might seem less “weird” if when they’re roasted, sauced with a tasty dressing and tossed with tangy, salty feta cheese. This is the impetus behind CCFB’s, Taste It! & Eat Fresh.

Taste It! has been part of Chester County Food Bank’s outreach programming for the past three years. The food demonstrations, offered as a facet of the Food Bank’s Food Security programming, allow people an opportunity to try foods they might not otherwise consider. When we receive an abundance of a specific vegetable, such as kale, a Taste It! volunteer will search through our recipe database, prepare a delicious dish and offer small samples to pantry clients and customers at our Fresh2You Mobile Market. The proof of a successful Taste It! demo is when we see people adding fruits and vegetables that they’ve just sampled to their baskets.

Volunteers are at the core of Taste It! The CCFB staff trains volunteers on not only basic food safety and presentation skills, but also gives tips on client engagement. Volunteers are then able to prepare nutritious recipe samples and share basic information about how to cook healthy food on a limited budget.  If you’re interested, please find more information and volunteer application here.

Eat Fresh is a series of cooking and nutrition classes that CCFB, in partnership with local community organizations, offers to provide youth and adults at risk for food insecurity with the tools and confidence to choose and cook healthy food for themselves and their families. Over the course of six weeks, each Eat Fresh participant practices hands-on cooking skills, learns how to select, decode and understand healthy recipes, and becomes acquainted with a range of fresh produce, whole grains and other healthy staples. To keep the momentum up at home, participants are welcome to take home the fresh fruits and veggies featured in class after each session.

We can see concrete evidence through Eat Fresh that when people are exposed to new foods and given the tools to cook simple, nutritious foods, they feel empowered to take a chance and discover all kinds of new foods.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food.

Emily Kovach

Photos: Ed Williams

Cupboard to Client: The Journey of Food from the CCFB to Those in Need

For food to get into the hands of our neighbors and community members who need it most, it must go on a journey. Just how does food travel to the Chester County Food Bank and then on to local food cupboards and into the hands of individuals who take it home? Here’s a sneak peek into the process:

  • Then, we organize the food. The CCFB is a relatively large organization, and we’re able to carefully manage the fresh produce, frozen foods and other items that pass through our doors. All of the food that comes through our system is weighed and entered into our inventory software system. The food is then stored in our warehouse and in our large refrigerator and freezer units.

We’ve spent the last seven and a half years building and honing the sophisticated food intake and storage capacity that we currently have in our 36,000-square-foot facility. And we’re growing! In the next few years, we will be increasing our refrigeration and freezer space so we can accept more fresh produce and more locally sourced dairy, poultry and meats.

  • The food is safely stored in our warehouse until our network of over 150 nonprofits, schools, senior centers and other organizations and agencies are ready to receive items. Distributions are made directly or through one of CCFB’s programs, such as our Weekend Backpack Program, Meals on Wheels, and our Summer Food Boxes. While the food is held in storage, our staff is constantly strategizing how to maximize the use and potential of each type of food.

For example: We receive funding from the State Food Purchase Program, a government grant through which we can purchase fresh produce, frozen meats, non-perishables and other items. We can use those funds to purchase more expensive foods that cupboards may not normally have, like shelf-stable milk, which can last on a pantry shelf for up to a year, is easy to transport and store and adds important nutrition to a family’s diet. We can use that grant money to ensure that any family that comes to one of the food cupboards can take home milk every time they visit.

  • We distribute the food. Each month, we send all of the agencies we work with a list of available foods and they choose what they’d like. Larger food cupboards may want items that enhance what they already have on shelves, while other smaller operations may depend entirely on the Chester County Food Bank. The food is then packed up and delivered to those locations in our three refrigerated box trucks.
  • Each agency or cupboard keeps their own lists of clients, who choose the location they’d like to visit based on their school districts. There are 14 school districts in Chester County and we ensure that there is at least one food cupboard in each district, and food security initiatives help clients know where to go. We work with a network of guidance counselors, senior centers, youth centers, county youth and family services, therapists, local churches, medical clinics and religious organizations who all can assist our neighbors in need know who’s open and who they can call. Our website also features a responsive map function that allows anyone to search for a nearby food cupboard, even from a library computer or pay-as-you-go phone. Each agency sets its own pick-up hours for their clients, who then take the food home to enjoy well-rounded meals all week or month long.

The glue that holds this whole system together—the guides for the food’s journey from cupboard to client—is volunteers. For both the Chester County Food Bank and our community partner agencies, it’s largely volunteer power that helps get food into the hands of the nearly 50,000 people who we provide food for each year. Without a doubt, volunteers are the real heroes with their boots on the ground, making sure that food cupboard doors are unlocked, taking deliveries, attending meetings and so much more. We are so grateful for our own volunteers, who help inspect, process and repack food for our programs, as well as the huge network of volunteers at local food pantries and cupboards. If it wasn’t for them, food would never be able to travel from cupboard to client, and many of our neighbors and community members would go hungry.

Want to learn moreSign up for our newsletter and stay connected. You can also donate foodfunds and time to help us achieve our mission. Call (610) 873-6000 to speak to someone about getting involved or requesting a tour. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food.

Emily Kovach

The Inspirational Legacy of Our Friend, Elmer Duckinfield

The sun seems a bit less bright today at the Chester County Food Bank as we mourn the passing of one of our early and distinguished pioneers. Elmer Duckinfield lost his brave and quiet battle with cancer on May 6, 2017, surrounded by his beloved family. Our hearts are broken; however, our spirits remain touched (and, dare we say, our lives changed) by a man who was the definition of compassion, enthusiasm and humility with his warm smile, soft-spoken voice and contagious way of inspiring us to become better citizens.

Twenty years ago, Elmer envisioned a need to “glean” local farms of excess produce while it was still on the vine or on the ground, and then to distribute fresh food to those in the local communities who needed it most. He selflessly compiled lists of available volunteers in the area and coordinated volunteer drives to take advantage of gathering the produce surplus. It was no surprise to find Elmer in the fields packing and loading up the goods until nightfall. We shared Elmer’s story of inspiration earlier this year and believe that you, too, will find it hard not to be touched by his love of giving back.

Phoebe Kitson-Davis, director of agency and community partnerships for the Food Bank, conveys, “Elmer held the title of ‘gleaning manager’ (a volunteer position) when he began the gleaning efforts in the county in conjunction with then-Commissioner (now state Senator) Andy Dinniman. This is a tremendous loss for all of us, but Elmer would want us to carry on—to continue to help those in need and work together to make Chester County a great place to live for everyone. He truly believed no one should ever go hungry. We vow to carry on his legacy.”

As part of a loving tribute to Elmer, why not join us with a donation in his honor to the Chester County Food Bank? Let his influential spirit and charitable philosophy live on and continue to make our community a better place. We collectively thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food. 

Ed Williams

Photos: Ed Williams

Meet Our Community Partner: Great Valley Food Cupboard

At the Chester County Food Bank, we’re proud to partner with a number of like-minded organizations around our region, whose missions align with ours.

One such partner is the Great Valley Food Cupboard (GVFC), in Devon. Since 2012, this community-oriented food pantry has made it its mission to help families fill their refrigerators and kitchen shelves with extra food each month. Its tagline is “Compassion in Action,” which is visible each week as it opens its doors to neighbors from surrounding communities. All those who visit the Great Valley Food Cupboard are treated with dignity and respect, and their needs are met with care that’s free of judgment.

Run by a volunteer staff, the GVFC is open each Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and the second Wednesday of each month from 6 to 8 p.m. During these hours, residents from the Tredyffrin Easttown School District and Great Valley School District are welcome to come to the cupboard, located in the Education Building of The Baptist Church in the Great Valley at 945 N. Valley Forge Rd. in Devon. GVFC serves more than 250 individuals every month.

Many food cupboards can only offer canned, dried and other nonperishable goods to their guests, but thanks to the partnership with Chester County Food Bank, the Great Valley Food Cupboard is also able to offer fresh fruit and vegetables. According to Carol Claypoole, a church volunteer who runs the food cupboard, clients really appreciate the variety and quality of the food they receive.

“It’s rewarding to see the relief on people’s faces when they receive their groceries,” she said. “Hearing, ‘You made this so easy!’ is always such a great feeling.”

This spring and summer, the staff at the Great Valley Food Cupboard is looking forward to providing produce to clients from the gardens at the church. It is one of the sites for the Chester County Food Bank’s Raised Bed Garden Program, and the food grown on-site adds a seasonal bounty to the offerings. Carol says, “The raised bed gardens are such a win-win experience for everyone … the folks who grow the gardens are proud to help and the folks that receive the food are so grateful.”

Any families who live in the Great Valley area who are in need of support and would like details on signing up for the Great Valley Food Cupboard should call the church’s office at 610-688-5445. The same number should be used for anyone interested in volunteering, as well.

Want to learn more about the Chester County Food Bank? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. You can also donate food, funds and time to help us achieve our mission. Call 610-873-6000 to speak to someone about getting involved or requesting a tour. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We mobilize the community to ensure access to real, healthy food.

Emily Kovach

Coatesville Food Summit: Community Cohesiveness Curtails Local Food Insecurities

American inventor Henry Ford once said, “Coming together is the beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” Ford’s words were put to the test as the Chester County Food Bank hosted its third annual Coatesville Food Summit, held at the Chester County Public Safety Training Campus.

According to sobering statistics provided by the city, the current population of Coatesville living in poverty is 35.3%. Of those, 8.3% are senior citizens over age 65. Out of 6,311 students within the Coatesville Area School District, over 50% are eligible to take advantage of free or reduced lunch programs. That’s close to 5,000 residents who are in need of food cupboards and agencies in the Coatesville area alone. In 2015, the Chester County Food Bank took the initiative to create a task force to address the critical issues surrounding the city’s food insecurities and ways to streamline food distribution.

The objective of the Food Summit is to assemble the city’s agencies and organizations who serve meals, distribute food, host nutrition education programs or grow food for the Coatesville community to discuss and determine solutions for improving food insecurity logistics, in addition to getting to know the faces behind the resources.

“Having participated in the Coatesville Food Summit since its inception, I find it to be a valuable resource for my organization in helping us to meet the complex needs of our clients,” noted Kathryn Spurlock, director of the Coatesville Center for Community Health. “I have met other food providers and learned to appreciate their strengths, as well as understand the challenges they face in supplying food to their constituents. Learning more about the Food Bank, as well as its operations and services available, has also enabled me to work more closely with them to provide greater access to food and education to the clients of our Center.”

Explaining further how the Summit specifically helps her organization, Kathryn continued, “Providing food resources has added value to the holistic approach we take at our Center in providing care and support for many aspects of personal and family life. Helping our clients to improve their health and nutrition improves their ability to cope with the personal challenges they are facing. Through the Coatesville Food Summit, we have improved our ability to approach providing food and resources as a community, and not just as one organization. This has helped us to have a greater understanding of the overall needs of Coatesville, and work to establish a more seamless approach to food delivery with less duplication. As a result, a more effective and efficient system helps Coatesville to thrive as a community.”  

Phoebe Kitson-Davis, Director of Agency and Community Partnerships for the Chester County Food Bank, explained how the Summit has evolved. “The first year, our goal was to get everyone in a room together to meet one another, to garner support with local politicians and services and make valuable connections while promoting constructive dialogue. Our second year concentrated more on bringing the partners together, operating hours of the organizations, educating each other on how we all serve the community while determining where specific gaps or overlaps in food distribution take place.”

The agenda of this year’s well-attended Summit consisted of an introduction of participants; specific programs, capabilities and goals of the Food Bank; discussions of an in-depth food assessment study being conducted by Drexel University and West Chester University regarding food insecurity from 2015–2016 in the Coatesville area, summer student feeding programs with the Coatesville Area School District and decisions regarding a single stream holiday food distribution.

As a result, the Food Bank will be forming a community-based committee that will assist with a food box distribution event on Saturday, November 18. “It will be a first for Coatesville to have one Thanksgiving distribution. We plan on modeling our distribution plan on the existing efficiently run by the Coatesville Youth Initiatives backpack program,” said Phoebe. “Invaluable community volunteers and business sponsorships are crucial, and a centrally located site is needed to make this a success for everyone. I anticipate close to 1,000 Thanksgiving food boxes to be allocated via our network of partners. That’s close to one-third of the total handled for the entire holiday season by the Food Bank.”  

This year, the roundtable of enthusiastic participants included Pastor Frank Fullwood, Jubilee Evangelistic Ministries; Sondra Young, Ash Park Terrace; Pastor Dave Harmer, Kingsway Church; Brother Dave,Tabernacle Baptist; Gloria Hicklen, Coatesville Co-Op and Kathryn Spurlock, Coatesville Center for Community Health.   

The team of dedicated organizations and personnel who made the summit happen include host site Chester County Emergency ServicesCoatesville Center for Community HealthCitadel Credit UnionSenator Andrew Dinniman and, of course, host Chester County Food Bank.

Want to learn more? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. You can also donate foodfunds and time to help us achieve our mission. Call (610) 873-6000 to speak to someone about getting involved or request a tour. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We mobilize our community to ensure access to real, healthy food.

Ed Williams

Photos: Ed Williams

Meet the Team: Nick Popov, Director of Warehouse and Logistics

As part of our reach into Chester County’s communities, we proudly present the first in a series of monthly stories highlighting one part of the Food Bank that works cohesively to feed, educate and introduce our programs into local residences, schools and businesses. We aim to give you valuable insight into what we do by sharing information about an individual who represents a specific department or partnership with our organization.

We’ve all heard that it takes a village to raise a child, and most people know The Chester County Food Bank helps to feed those in our local “villages.” But one vital and growing part of our operation is often overlooked—our hard-working drivers who manage the complex food distribution logistics that help move over two million pounds of food annually .

Fortunately, we have Nick Popov, who will be with the Food Bank for six years this June. He began as a driver learning the procedures, the partners, the roads and highways and grew into the perfect person to manage our massive distribution of food.

Nick was recently promoted to a senior staff position and has been described by co-workers and volunteers as hardworking, dedicated and humble. He now manages our team of drivers in addition to several other tasks required to handle the volume and traffic of food in and out of the Food Bank and on the roads of Chester County.

We asked Nick a few questions on what he does that makes his job so crucial to the team here at the Chester County Food Bank.

Briefly explain what your responsibilities are for CCFB.

My department handles many different tasks to get food from the Food Bank to our partner agencies. That includes:

  • Planning routes and deliveries
  • Coordinating with agencies to determine wants and needs
  • Overseeing the acceptance of food deliveries into our warehouse as well as the input into our inventory system
  • Mapping and efficiently plotting the warehouse
  • Maintaining our fleet

How many are in your staff and what are their responsibilities?

I work with four great employees:

  • Josh Fisher—Warehouse Receiving Coordinator
  • Bud Hannah—Driver/ Warehouse Associate
  • Philip Biaesch—Driver/ Warehouse Associate
  • Nathan Sletvold—Warehouse Associate

How many trucks are you responsible for and how much food can they hold?

We have 3 trucks and a van:

  • Truck one has six pallet spots capable of hauling 9,000 pounds.
  • Truck two has eight pallet spots capable of hauling 7,500 pounds.
  • Truck three has 12 pallet spots capable of legally hauling 10,000 pounds.

How many pounds of food would you estimate come through the CCFB channel of distribution (incoming and outgoing)?

In calendar year 2016, we processed:

  • Incoming food totaling 2,317,103 pounds.
  • Outgoing food totaling 2,580,226 pounds.

What would you consider your biggest challenges with distribution?

My team works hard to make sure we’re:

  • Meeting the needs of such a large and diverse county.
  • Getting people exactly what they want and when they want it (due to size of vehicles and availability of products).
  • Working my drivers’ schedules to match those of the volunteers at the agencies.

So if you see one of our brightly colored trucks or van out and about, give a friendly wave to our hardworking drivers—we certainly appreciate them!

Want to learn more? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. You can also donate foodfunds and time to help us achieve our mission. Call 610-873-6000 to speak to someone about getting involved or request a tour. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We take a steadfast approach to provide food and build support in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among our community.

Ed Williams

We’re Always Prepared for Emergency Response

It always pays to be prepared for emergencies—a first-aid kit in a backpack, a spare tire in the trunk of your car and a fire extinguisher in the kitchen are simple, everyday examples of how we can keep ahead of troubling situations that can crop up unexpectedly.

While the Chester County Food Bank is known for continuously striving to bring food insecurity for our communities to a minimum, we are also instrumental in maintaining a state of preparedness for catastrophic events within our county in collaboration with the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

Blizzards, ice storms, severe thunderstorms, flooding and other emergencies where power may be lost for any length of time require the Food Bank to ramp up within six hours of being notified.

Our Emergency Response Program is committed to providing 1,000 neighbors with hot meals, snacks and water as well as items typically needed during an emergency, such as batteries, extension cords, paper products, detergents, electrical tape, Sterno burners and gloves, which are picked up by the American Red Cross as needed. The emergency meals are prepared in advance by our staff and volunteers and kept frozen at our facility. We have been fortunate to partner with the Wegmans Culinary Team for meal production. It’s also worth noting: Per industry common practice, we have a quarterly rotation schedule for the meals so if they are not needed, then they are distributed to one of our partner meal sites.

We want to make sure that all the bases are covered regarding the well-being of our communities and emergency response—it’s a priority that just makes sense to us.

 

 

Want to learn more? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. You can also donate foodfunds and time to help us achieve our mission. Call (610) 873-6000 to speak to someone about getting involved. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We take a steadfast approach to provide food and build support in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among our community.

Ed Williams

A New Day Dawns: Helping Victims Become Survivors of Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is defined as a form of modern slavery (labor and/or sexual) that occurs in every state, including Pennsylvania.

Emma (not her real name; details changed for anonymity) continued walking toward town in a chilly, windswept rain. At 14 years old, she can’t drive yet and she was saving what little cash she had to take a bus into the city. Her backpack felt too light as she dodged sheepishly into a coffee shop to dry off and get warm among unfamiliar faces before continuing to the bus stop.

The older gentleman wearing a thick turtleneck sweater and designer glasses nodded and smiled kindly as Emma sat next to him. He reminded her of a teacher she had in school. She shivered as she remembered her mother’s new boyfriend leering at her and being inappropriate. “Can I buy you a cup of hot chocolate?” the kind stranger asked and broke through her dark memory. 

Unfortunately, Emma is on her way to become the latest in a growing number of human trafficking statistics in Southeastern Pennsylvania, including Chester County.

“Most people tend to think that human trafficking is a problem in faraway lands, with violent kidnappings in developing-world environments,” explains Carol Metzker, consultant for the Salvation Army’s New Day to Stop Trafficking Program. “They don’t realize that the problem exists right in our own backyard.”

Victims quickly lose dignity and become emotionally and many times physically dependent upon their traffickers. They lose the basic right of choice and eventually find themselves in a seemingly unending cycle of violence and desperation.

cc-food-bank-human-trafficking-3

But there is help for these victims to recover and meld back into society while becoming empowered as survivors. It takes a village, and with the supportive partnership with the Chester County Food Bank, the Salvation Army’s New Day to Stop Trafficking victim services is a first stop in the battery of programs ready to take on this painful challenge.

Case Management services include working with the victim to be located a safe, undisclosed place—where he or she can receive clothing and services, and stay out of the grasp of traffickers. If the victim has children, they, too, can be provided for at this point.

The Food Bank helps by providing “grab-and-go bags” for the victims and their families. These reusable bags provide nonperishables like peanut butter, crackers, microwavable items and more to sustain the victim as the search for a job or housing can begin.

The Salvation Army’s New Day Women’s Drop In Center is a “drop-in” facility in Philadelphia’s Kensington neighborhood that assists street walk-ins, including women from Chester County, by providing a temporary location for safe rest, a shower and basic necessities. Open during the day and some evenings, it provides a way for women to get in contact with social workers and various safety nets that will hopefully help direct them to further steps in becoming a survivor.

The Food Bank provides portable “street-smart” waterproof reusable food bags with basics such as water, granola bars and crackers for sustenance.

The Salvation Army’s New Day New Home will be opening this month at an undisclosed location and will be an operating residence for women from 18 to 24 years of age who were trafficked as minors and are “aging out” of child protective services.

The Chester County Food Bank is again instrumental in coordinating the leaders of a local Girl Scout group out of Coatesville to run a drive to gather food to stock the cabinets and pantry for New Day New Home. Basic living items like flour, salt, sugar, coffee, tea and canned and packaged goods will be in place before eight women take residence. Many of the food items requested are fair trade when possible.

cc-food-bank-human-trafficking-4

“We are so grateful for our partnership with the Chester County Food Bank for the past three years,” notes Metzker, “and look forward to a continued satisfying relationship.”

If you’d like to help or get additional details and information, visit the following links:

Sign up for our in-depth newsletter and be sure to follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram for up-to-the-minute information.

The Chester County Food Bank is nonprofit and the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 partner agencies in Chester County, Pa. Through our network of food cupboardshot meal sites, shelters and other social service organizations, we distribute over 2.5 million pounds to our neighbors with limited or uncertain access to adequate food. We also take a steadfast approach to provide food and build support in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among our community. Visit our Nutrition Education page to learn about how our programs are making inroads in the fight against hunger. We are located at 650 Pennsylvania Dr., Exton, Pa. 19341.

Ed Williams

Photos: Carol Metzker

Meals on Wheels + CCFB = Serving Our Neighbors

One of our most rewarding programs is with our friends at Meals on Wheels of Chester County. Through this partnership, we make sure 2,000 meals move through Meals on Wheels each month.

“We enjoy being able to do this, and especially hearing the stories that come back from volunteers,” said Chester County Food Bank‘s Food Drive & Procurement Coordinator Claudia Rose-Muir. “It’s heartwarming to hear compliments like, ‘That pot roast reminds me of my mom’s. I even attended one woman’s 100th birthday party.  It’s so rewarding to see the difference we make.”

The Chester County Food Bank prepares hot meals for three Meals on Wheels of Chester County chapters. That food is delivered to county residents by volunteers Monday through Friday, predominantly seniors. The drop-off also helps to combat loneliness and isolation with a friendly visit and a safety check. Anyone, regardless of age or economic status, who is homebound, handicapped, or convalescing from an illness or operation and is unable to prepare a nutritious meal, is eligible to receive Meals on Wheels.

ccfb-meals-on-wheels-2

We also provide Meals on Wheels of Chester County frozen meals with accompaniments: juice, bread and butter, and a snack. This is separate from the Monday through Friday volunteer deliveries; these boxes include five meals and sides that we deliver to Meals on Wheels of Chester County for distribution as needed.

“This program is a small revenue stream for the Chester County Food Bank,” Claudia added. “We are always in need of donations of food, money and time to keep our programs running and to serve our Chester County neighbors.”

Want to learn more? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. Need Meals on Wheels of Chester County’s services, or know someone who could use a hand? Call (610) 873-6000.

Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

The Chester County Food Bank is the central hunger relief organization serving more than 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations throughout Chester County. We take a steadfast approach to provide food and build support in the neediest communities, while raising awareness and engagement among our community. 

Nina Malone

Take a Tour Through Our New Website

We’re busting-at-the-seams proud of our new website and its simple (but fun!) layout. Our goal was to make the site easy to navigate so our community can more easily engage with the Chester County Food Bank.

Take a stroll through the site and learn about us, our food sourcesprograms and education and community partners. You’ll find the latest on our Fresh2You Mobile Market and how to host a food drive (check out our new food drive toolkit!). But most importantly, you can quickly access how to find foodget involved and donate:

Click on Need Food? to find a local food provider or hot meal site.

ccfb-need-food-cropped

Click on Get Involved to learn about how you can make a difference right in your own backyard.

ccfb-get-involved-cropped

Click on Donate to provide much needed funds to keep our programs strong and to serve those in need.

ccfb-donate-page

More exciting news—our friends at WSFS bank are matching donations during the month of October! It’s their way of celebrating our new web presence.

Want to be in the know about what we’re doing in your community? Sign up for our newsletter and stay connected. Thanks to you, we’re growing a healthier community.

ccfb-stay-connected

The Chester County Food Bank collects, stores and distributes food to over 120 food cupboards, meal sites and social service organizations. Since our beginning in 2009, we have increased distribution over 119% by distributing 2.5 million pounds of food. The Food Bank partners with donors, volunteers, farmers, schools and businesses to address hunger and food insecurity with compassion and creativity.

Nina Malone